Obama speech on shared values to conclude Kenya visit

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US President Barack Obama is to conclude his visit to Kenya with a televised address at a sports stadium in the capital, Nairobi.

The BBC’s Karen Allen in Nairobi says he is expected to underscore the shared values of the two countries but also touch on human rights.

On Saturday, President Obama discussed security issues with his Kenyan counterpart, Uhuru Kenyatta.

Later on Sunday, President Obama will fly on to Ethiopia.

The Kasarani stadium, where the US leader will make his speech, was last year used as a controversial detention camp for hundreds of Somalis during an operation against the Islamist group al-Shabab.

Our correspondent says Mr Obama is expected to warn that such tactics risk alienating communities and stoking radicalism.

On Saturday Mr Obama acknowledged the role the Kenyan government had played in the fight against militant groups such as al-Shabab.

The jihadist group has carried out a deadly campaign in Kenya including the 2013 attack on Nairobi’s Westgate shopping centre and an attack in April in Garissa that killed nearly 150 people.

Security has been tight for Mr Obama’s two-day visit to Kenya.

The trip, which began on Friday, is his first visit as president to the land where his father was born.

Barack Obama and Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta at news conference. 25 July 2015
President Obama and President Kenyatta differed sharply on the issue of gay rights

In Ethiopia, he will be the first US president to visit the country. He will also become the first US leader to address the 54-member African Union (AU) on Tuesday.

AU Commission chief Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma described the trip to Ethiopia as a “historic visit” that would “broaden and deepen the relationship between the AU and the US”.

On Saturday, Mr Obama praised Africa’s economic and business potential in a speech at a business summit.

He also visited a memorial for those killed in the 1998 US embassy bombing in Nairobi.

After holding bilateral talks, President Obama and President Kenyatta said they were “united against terrorism”.

But they differed sharply in their positions on gay rights. While Mr Obama spoke strongly against discrimination, Mr Kenyatta said Kenya did not share the same values.

SOURCE: bbc